World of Wool at the Wool BnB, Campaign for Wool


The first Wool BnB


The Campaign for Wool marked its seventh successful year with its annual Wool Week in October that celebrated all things woolly.


Alternative loves wool and we swiftly got into the spirit for Woolly Hat Day to help The Campaign for Wool and its friends at ‘Mission to Seafarers’ to fundraise and support their incredible work.


But our highlight of Wool Week was taking part in The Campaign for Wool’s first ever Wool BnB where everything from carpets to cardigans was made of this most natural of fibres.


This BnB in cool North London welcomed guests warmly. The Campaign for Wool’s brand kitted out the whole house, which starred vibrant rugs from Alternative Flooring with Liberty FabricsStrawberry Meadow, Flowers of Thorpe and Felix Raison paisley. It really was a joyful house dressed from floor to ceiling with interiors and fashion designs made of Wool including our friends, Melin Tregwynt, Fine Cell Work and wool art by Jessica Dance. Apart from our collection we loved the bedroom, which boasted a luxury wool-filled mattresses, pillows, duvets, cosy blankets and nightwear showing how wool aids a good night’s sleep. Guests could even have a woolly overnight stay with a knitted breakfast. There was even a Shepherds’ hut and a few sheep in the back garden!


Every year The Campaign for Wool create something very special and the Wool B&B received terrific support from the media with lots of press visits.


About The Campaign for Wool


The Campaign for Wool was launched in 2010 to educate consumers about the benefits of wool, promote wool-rich products to a national audience and help to support and grow the wool industry. Run by a coalition of industry groups convened by HRH The Prince of Wales, the campaign works to engage consumers through exciting fashion, interiors, artisan and design lead activities centering around Wool Week each year.


The Campaign for Wool is jointly funded by some of the largest wool grower organisations in the world. Key nation partners include the British Wool Marketing Board, Australian Wool Innovation/The Woolmark Company, Cape Wools South Africa and Campaign for Wool New Zealand. All have shown incredible support and contributed to the global success of His Royal Highness’s Campaign for Wool since its inception.



About Wool


Wool is a fibre of infinite potential with a vast array of benefits.  Completely natural, sustainable and recyclable, this superior fibre is both versatile and durable with many unique performance properties unbeknown to consumers. For floors it is also wonderfully resilient, a natural insulator and effective sound proofer.


In next month’s blog we interview the wool queen Bridgette Kelly of the British Wool Marketing Board who travels the world with wool and shares her vision for a woolly future.




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Lorna Haigh



Alternative Flooring’s head of creative and marketing Lorna Haigh tells us the story behind this meeting of minds, working together to create this glorious new collection.




How did the story begin?

Well, who doesn’t love Liberty and adore the shop.  A leader in print design and textile innovation, Liberty Fabrics has been creating original and inspiring designs for more than 130 years.  Alternative has worked with great British designers  – Ashley Hicks, Ben Pentreath and Margo Selby to bring new pattern to our distinctive Quirky B collection.  This time we approached Liberty and we are delighted that they were as enthusiastic as we were.


Both brands have history of British making. Was that an important factor?

Britain has a fine history of producing quality brands with craftsmanship. Liberty Fabrics and Alternative Flooring continue this tradition. Supporting British design and manufacturing were key factors in launching Quirky B. and working with Liberty Fabrics with its commitment and passion for design excellence and its rich heritage of Liberty print that continues today.


We can’t believe Liberty patterns have not been used on floors before. Is this really a first?

Yes, this is the first time that Liberty Fabrics has used its iconic patterns on a carpet. It is a new visualisation for the most desirable Liberty designs, bringing them into our interiors in a unique, original and innovative way. Enchanting flowery gardens, meadows, shells and exotic paisley have now been brought to life on floors.


Who selects the patterns? Did you delve into their archives?

This has been an exciting project as archival and classic Liberty prints were chosen. Working with the Liberty Design studio, designs were selected based on the current Liberty Fabrics collections (based on designs taken form their archive) and designs which both parties thought would work well on the floor. 


Alternative’s studio were given the selected designs and colourways in the actual fabric to work to.  The fabric designs were then reinterpreted in both in pattern and scale to achieve as close to the original fabric design as possible.  Some were amazingly spot on others were more difficult to achieve. At least seven designs were originally worked up in CAD format and from these computer designs some were selected for a carpet hand trial.  Colour accuracy was incredibly important. The right green and grey was difficult to achieve with so many variants.



Images clockwise from top left to bottom right, showing original Liberty Fabric design inspiration and Alternative Flooring collection: Flowers of Thorpe, Strawberry Meadow, Felix Raison and Capello Shell


Can you name the designs and tell us the story behind each one?

For me, if there is a story or meaning behind a design, then that makes it more interesting.


Flowers of Thorpe is a classic Liberty floral, created in the 1970s but emulating the wonderful small flower designs, which were so popular at Liberty in the 1930s, and a style the brand has become synonymous with. 


Felix Raison is a magnificent bohemian design re-worked from a stunning hand painted original mid 19th Century Paisley shawl from the Liberty archive.


Strawberry Meadow is an original, hand drawn Liberty Design Studio exclusive of William Morris’s famous design ‘Strawberry Thief.’ Created in 1883 and features strawberry bushes and birds in tonal shades that translate beautifully as carpet.


Capello Shell is part of ‘The Secret Garden Collection’ inspired by the celebrated novel ‘The Secret Garden’ written by Frances Hodgson Burnett in 1911. 


Did you change the scale of the originals and are the colours authentic?

The scale in all the designs has had to be changed to get them to work in carpet. Many of the designs, like Strawberry Meadow are figurative and just would not have worked well in carpet unless it was upscaled. Capello Shell has a much smaller motif in the fabric than in the carpet .


Where and how are these carpets woven?

The carpet is expertly woven on the new state of the art axminster loom in Salisbury.  Liberty carpets were some of the first carpets to come off this loom, so again, a great story of new technology applied to a traditional craft and heritage design with refashioned colourways.


Did you have fun shooting the collection?

The location was really important. So we went for a very British heritage property in Somerset. The period features combined with the contemporary styling by Susie Clegg bring this collection to life and Susie selected props from companies such as Pinch, Skandium and Abigail Ahern.


The carpets are beautiful and statement pieces so it wasn’t hard for them to make them the hero of the shot. We did take one shot, which is an image of the location with Flowers of Thorpe laid out at the front. Ben, the photographer, had to pull back massively to get everything in and ended shooting it from the confines of a Laurel bush!


Creative shoot location and Ben the photographer in action


How do you see these designs being used in interior spaces?

Liberty patterns are loved worldwide. Whether it’s a gloriously colourful floral or a muted symmetrical shell pattern, these are true classics that will stand the test of time.


But is all about how you use them as these would fit into classic and contemporary spaces.  These iconic patterns do the talking so you may wish to keep the other furnishings simple to let the carpet stand out.


You can have carpets or bespoke rugs. Strawberry Meadow is perfect for period homes with its Arts & Craft heritage. Flowers of Thorpe would look great in modern and retro settings. Capello Shell is a symmetrical and tonal design that is sophisticated and subtle while Felix Raison paisley is for lovers of fashion and boho chic.


And finally, which is your favourite?

A difficult one. I love Flowers of Thorpe Summer Meadow. It is such a happy carpet and I can see people singing down their stairs with this under their feet. I do however adore Strawberry Meadow with the William Morris influence. It is such a classic but not definitely not boring. I would always be looking for the song thrush. It looks cheeky – after all it was a thief!


Quirky B Strawberry Meadow


Quirky B – Alternative Flooring with Liberty Fabrics



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Images clockwise from top left: Make Me A Rug selection of rugs, Sisal Super Boucle Bodmin with Moss and Porcelain border made with Alternative Flooring’s Make Me A Rug online service, Mr Blue Sky lifestyle shot, Mr Blue Sky detail, Big Jute runner, Big Jute runner detail, Wool Herringbone lifestyle shot and Wool Herringbone detail


The easiest way to add on trend colour, texture and pattern accents to your home this season is with rugs.


Alternative’s MAKE ME A RUG has been redesigned and has a cool NEW VIDEO starring the MAD ABOUT THE HOUSE interiors writer Kate Watson-Smyth who shows the five easy steps to creating your customised rug. Kate goes wild with the QUIRKY B black and white ZEBO animal print with a dazzlingly bright pink border. Read more on Kate’s blog HOW TO DECORATE WITH RUGS. There are thousands of flooring and border combinations to choose from. Decorating with rugs opens up a world of possibilities.


Whether they speak softly or shout loudly, personalised rugs give you a chance to be yourself, be alternative. Here are a few tips on how to select the right rug for the different spaces in your home.


In the living room give yourself free rein to go as loud as you like! Here a rug can be the starting point or certainly part of the overall decorating scheme. Using colourful shades in the home can be tricky but we are not talking hot and neon but rather more organic brights such as damson and lime, both easy to embrace as an accent tone on a rug. QUIRKY B is bursting with gorgeous patterns in these hues that translate beautifully as a generous bespoke rug.


There ain’t a cloud in sight with the glorious MR BLUE SKY that looks fresh and cool as a rug.  Why not create your own summer rug with our ROCK ‘N’ ROLL stripes that are striking and versatile enough to fit into any room.


Herringbone is a classic design for nature lovers and our WOOL HERRINGBONE WITH A NEW THISTLE border makes a comforting rug for sitting rooms and go big in the bedroom! An indulgent wall-to wall wool rug makes the bedroom much softer and quieter. Here keep colours light, textures soft and patterns subtle.


Our hand-woven, natural-fibre rugs make the home your most exotic destination yet! Chunky textures make relaxing rugs for the sitting and dining room. Big Jute tends to be softer is a natural choice for bedrooms. More tightly-woven looped weaves make hardwearing rugs and runners for home offices, hallways and stairs.


If you really want to be in tune with nature this season, then make sure you have a natural fibre rug edged with verdant green accents. The indoor gardener and botanical trend is perfectly captured in our tactile SISAL SUPER BOUCLE Bodmin with Moss and Porcelain border rug that looks absolutely fabulous with giant pot plants.

Why not browse the collections for further inspiration and get designing with MAKE ME A RUG?


Make Me A Rug

Make Me A Rug Video

Alternative Flooring’s New Borders


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Kate Watson-Smyth has been a national newspaper journalist for over 20 years. She also writes the UK’s number 1 interiors blog and runs a successful interior styling business. Her first book Shades of Grey was published in February.


Images in top row: Quirky B Zebo Black, Big Jute Herringbone Bagel, Margo Selby collection – Quirky B Shuttle PeterQuirky B Honeycomb Duck Egg and Quirky B Spotty Damson

Images in middle row: Make Me A Rug online service examples of Quirky B Zebo Black rug with Cotton Apple border and Quirky B Honeycomb Duck Egg with Cotton Bluebird border

Images in bottom row: Jot rug borders in Iris, Emerald and Biscotti and Cotton Herringbone rug borders in Squash and Bayberry


For the first time Alternative Flooring’s Make Me A Rug service offers Quirky B pattern along with lots of new borders. This fabulous service has a new video that shows the five easy steps -choose a design from natural and wool flooring collections, select a border style, pick a border, add your dimensions and see your finished rug in a choice of different interior settings.


We asked fellow rug lover and star of our Make Me A Rug video Kate Watson-Smyth a few questions about how rugs can transform your home.


Are you a rug lover?

I absolutely am! My house has no carpet and I love the look of bare boards covered in different rugs. It’s a great way to decorate your home as you can change the rugs as the mood suits and, in doing, so completely change the personality of the room.


Do you have rugs in your home?

Yes I have rugs in every room. A very battered vintage Persian one under the kitchen table, which hides a multitude of red wine and food stains, several similar ones layered up in the sitting room and a plain one in the spare room. The bedside rugs are the sheepskins that my children used to have in their pushchairs.


Tips on decorating with rugs?

Well rules are made to be broken, but there are a couple of guidelines that I think are important. Firstly, buy the biggest rug you can afford for the space. Secondly, in the sitting room (for example), a rug should be anchored by the front legs of the sofa (at the very least). A small rug under the coffee table that doesn’t touch any furniture creates an island and doesn’t pull the room together. If you have only small rugs then layer them up to cover a larger space. Or, as I said, one big one that fills the space to about 18inches from the walls.

The one exception I would make is if you have an unusually shaped rug – the cowhides and sheepskins – they can sit as islands because of their shape. Otherwise, the rectangles and squares should be large and luxurious.


Any rug trends that you’ve spotted?

I think, as with all aspects of interior decoration, we are getting braver and bolder in our choices and that’s great. If you’re being sensible and buying a plain sofa so that it lasts for years and goes with everything then have a bit of fun with the rugs. You can afford to be bold with rugs as it’s easy to move them around to other rooms or even to change them seasonally so you don’t have to look at the same thing all the time. We change our clothes with the weather so why not our soft furnishings? Our homes don’t’ have to wear a uniform. The geometric look has been around for a while and shows no sign of disappearing and I’m a big fan of Dotty, which I have on my stairs. We’ve seen stripes around for a long time and I think a move towards spots is overdue. Also, whisper it quietly, I think the patterned carpet is due a comeback but it will be done in a totally new and modern way.


What about layering – the more the merrier?

Layering rugs offers an easy way to add even more colour and pattern to a room or experiment with trends. Do you agree?

Completely (see above). Layering can be tricky to pull off though. So the general idea is that they must all be Persian, or all Kilims or all Dhurries or all carpets. You can’t mix the materials. Then, you can totally clash the patterns as long as there is a common thread in the colours to hold your scheme together. If you have wildly clashing colours then try to keep the patterns similar: geometric or floral or striped. As with all these things, it’s hard to know what works until you see it. If you are planning this look in your home then just keep experimenting until you feel it works. Then roll up the ones that didn’t and use them in another room.


What about size?

Don’t skimp on size – are rugs getting bigger or it is just our imagination?

As I said, rugs should be as big as you can afford. Small rugs dotted around look dated and create a series of islands in your room rather than one cohesive space. The rug is the anchor that holds everything down. In addition to that, small rugs are not inviting. A large rug should invite you to step on it, preferably in bare feet.



See how Kate gets designing her personalised rug with Alternative Flooring’s Make Me A Rug online service! Watch the video here:

Alternative Flooring – Make Me A Rug


Tell us a bit about Make Me A Rug Service  and how this now includes the Quirky B pattern and even more borders !

The new Make Me A Rug Service has all the fabulous patterns from before but now they can be made into large rugs so they are perfect for any room in the house. There are lots of choices of border, so you can experiment to find the right look for you. Or, you can play it safe with the large range of neutrals but, if you do want to do that, can I urge you to have fun with the borders?


How easy did you find it?

It’s incredibly easy and user-friendly and I love that there is a choice of room photographs so you can see how a rug might look in a different space. There are also a variety of floors so you can tell how it will look on painted boards, or parquet for example.


Take us through your Make Me A Rug Experience

I have long been a fan of the Quirky B Zebo but knew that if it only came as a runner it wasn’t quite right for my house. When I realised that it was possible to make a rug from it, I didn’t hesitate. My only decision was in choosing the border. I couldn’t decide if black would be more subtle and allow the zebra pattern to stand out, or if a contrasting colour would be better. In the end I got samples of both so I could decide in real life and in my house rather than just online. You can see which way I jumped below….


Et Violà – here’s the rug and runners in my home!


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Images clockwise from top left: Alternative’s Wool Sprinkle Petal, Alternative’s Wool Sprinkle Petal detail, Pantone Colour of the Year Rose Quartz and Serenity, Canvas Home La Vienne collection



Sprinkles of spring for interiors


Put your best foot forward with Alternative and discover the latest trends for floors. The new Wool Sprinkle is just right for spring. It is naturally tactile with a sprinkling of colour.  The rose shade is perfect for this season’s passion for romantic floral prints ranging from delicate cherry blossoms to big showy blooms.


This mood for soft pink started to flower with The Pantone colour of the year, a blend of two shades – gentle Rose Quartz and the light and airy Serenity. Both join easily with other mid-tones including greens and purples and all shades of yellow and pink.


Mix in brights and silver for more splash and sparkle.  Or add this season’s hottest trend accent shade of Chartreuse  – a delicate but vivid green, and your home will be full of energy.



Images clockwise from top left: Alternative’s Wool Crafty Hound Whippet, Wool Crafty Diamond Lasque, Wool Crafty Cross Celtic, Wool Crafty Cross Celtic detail, Barefoot Ashtanga Silk Hero, Barefoot Ashtanga Silk Hero detail, Barefoot Ashtanga Silk Firefly



If springtime calls for softer shades then it welcomes softer surfaces too. Why not liberate your senses and indulge in the pleasure of touch? It’s time not just to bring the refreshing outdoor tones inside but it’s time to feel your floor! Go for wall-to wall wool carpet or Make Me A Rug and layer rugs on top of a wood floor for interest and comfort.


Pink shades and plush surfaces are popular this season but the trend for contemporary craft just keeps on growing. Step out in style with Alternative’s new Wool Crafty, a jaunty trio of subtle patterns in nature’s palette. The hounds tooth canine check creeps off the catwalk and onto our floors. The classy diamond is a fashionably cool geometric and the cross is this season’s natural plaid.


We love wool but combine with silky highlights and you have an even more fashionable floor to sink your toes into. Barefoot Ashtanga Silk is a deliciously luxurious carpet full of softness and warmth that is the ultimate in discreet glamour. It marries the beauty of wool with the lustre of silk rayon.


It not only has that handmade feeling but its design-led natural palette can be dressed up with blush pink, pearly grey and smokey brown to create chic looks for both classic and contemporary schemes.


Why not browse the collections for further inspiration?


Get inspired from our Pinterest Board – Alternative Pink:


Follow us on social media for more creative floor ideas:

Facebook | Twitter | Houzz | Instagram



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Images clockwise from top left: Quirky B Lattice and Quirky B Tetra with swatches – Ben Pentreath for Alternative Flooring, Quirky B Daisy and Quirky B Chainmail with swatches – Ashley Hicks for Alternative Flooring , Quirky B Fair Isle and Quirky B ShuttleMargo Selby for Alternative Flooring, view from the interior of Pentreath & Hall’s London shop, view of interior designed by Ashley Hicks, still from Margo Selby‘s new Santa Fe patterned weave


It’s time to celebrate the Queen’s 90th birthday! It’s also time to shout about great British design and our nation’s love of pattern. Who better to talk about patterned carpet then Alternative Flooring’s three collaborators Ben Pentreath, Margo Selby and Ashley Hicks?


Ben Pentreath is one of the UK’s leading architectural and interior designers. He is a great exponent of English style. His architectural practice has worked on projects including projects for The Prince of Wales.


‘I am thrilled to add pattern to Alternative Flooring’s distinguished ‘Quirky B’ collection. Pentreath & Hall designed a range of printed papers based on stone and marble flooring patterns by the prolific 18th century architect, Batty Langley. It was a delight to put these back where they belong, on the floor – but re-worked in a range of vividly coloured patterns in the Alternative Flooring wools.


These three-dimensional patterns play with space in a way that creates rich textures for the contemporary interior.  Rooted in tradition, I am always surprised how fresh and modern these classical designs can be, and it’s been a real honour to work with the talented people at Alternative Flooring to bring this collection to fruition.’ 


Margo Selby is the Queen of weave, who has translated her colourful handcrafted fabrics to carpet and runners. Fair Isle and Shuttle reflect her trademark 3-dimensional graphic pattern in a punchy palette. These designs are developed on handlooms by Margo in her studio and then woven into broadloom carpets.  These geometric carpets are also at the forefront of design for 2016


‘I am excited to see both carpet and colour are back in fashion. The designs were originally produced as soft silk and wool fabrics on my hand loom and have been blown up and re-coloured to make them suitable for flooring. The graphic colour combinations with contrasting light and dark shades give a deep textural feel to this patterned carpet and runners.’ 


If Margo is the Queen of weave then Ashley Hicks must be the king of British interior and furniture design. He has made his distinctive mark on pattern carpet too, designing Chainmail and Daisy.


‘I love pattern and especially on the floor. It gives instant character and vitality to a space. I created the Chainmail design for a roomset at Somerset House, but its angular geometry would work just as well anywhere. A play on traditional hexagon grids, its interwoven chain links give a dynamic edge to a room. Daisy, inspired by wall-decoration in an old temple in Sri Lanka, has a punchy, Pop presence that will inject a touch of 60’s glamour into any room.’ 


Britain has a fine history of craftsmanship and Alternative Flooring, continues this tradition making cool, contemporary carpet on axminster looms in Salisbury, Wiltshire. Supporting both British industry and manufacturing were key factors in launching Quirky B. Anything designed and made in Britain is quite a coup these days, making this patterned wool carpet a collection to celebrate.



Just browse our collection


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As a stylist Susie helps create beautiful and inspiring editorial and advertising shoots for some of the world’s leading interiors magazines and brands. Susie has been ‘shopping, propping and making things look pretty’ for more than 15 years.


Her passion for interiors has a strong basis in design. Susie studied both furniture and interior design before working as a buyer and trends forecaster for a leading Interiors brand. This background led her naturally into the world of styling and she established her own business.


Alongside Styling, Susie has now curated an online shop, being out and about all the time means Susie can spot the most amazing things in the most unusual places.


Props and Location


Prepping & Propping: The day in a life of an interior stylist….


The planning for the Alternative Flooring shoot is a detailed and thorough process, and is just as important as the shoot itself.


Once I have the brief from Lorna Haigh, head of creative and marketing at Alternative then the planning can begin. Lorna appoints a bespoke team comprising the stylist, photographer and art director.


For me, the first and most pivotal part is the selection of a location to shoot in, which reflects the themes of the product and the brand well.


After making a selection of suitable location houses, I will go and recce them and then choose the best location that suits the style of the shoot. This time it requires something, calm, eclectic and homely. I found this house through Light Locations – a photo location agency providing beautiful, inspiring lifestyle locations to the film/TV and photographic industry.


Location hunting is great fun but the trick is finding original gems that haven’t graced the pages of every magazine. This black cladded forest house in East Sussex is different and has fabulous open plan spaces filled with natural light.


Locations have to be spacious for a flooring shoot and have good stairways. I look for large windows, paneled walls and in this case rustic floorboards. It may look white but this is a location house that allows us to paint and decorate. The only condition is that leave it as we found it.


Whilst searching for the location, I am constantly thinking about Alternative’s new collections and which furniture and props I am going to use as part of the shoot. These extra incidental items will create the environment to hero the product within the shot. These items will enhance and present that product in the best way possible.


The wool carpet ranges that we are shooting are Wool Crafty from the eco-friendly all wool carpet collection and the luxuriously soft Barefoot Ashtanga silk designs.


There is also chunky jute carpet  that is great for tactile wall-to-wall flooring or modern rugs and more great British patterned carpets from Alternative’s new collaborator.




Whilst searching for the location, I am constantly thinking about the selection of which furniture & props I am going to use as part of the shoot. These extra incidental items will create the environment to hero the product within the shot. These items will enhance and present that product in the best way possible. Two of the ranges that we are shooting are Wool Crafty from the eco-friendly all wool carpet collection and the luxurious new Barefoot Ashtanga Silk designs.


Swatches – Big Jute Herringbone Bagel, Wool Crafty Diamond and Cross


Swatches – Barefoot Ashtanga Silk



The props may need to reflect a certain trend or feeling, for this shoot I needed a mix of vintage and natural props to create the overall look.


I use a mix of sources, some props I would hire from a dedicated prop house – where they stock a large variety of furniture and accessory pieces and then to mix with these, a few key pieces from the high street and then a good handful of vintage pieces.


I shop a lot! I find pieces everywhere. Once I’ve been properly briefed for a project I keep my eyes peeled wherever I am. During weekends away, driving around, I am always on the look out for vintage shops and little independent boutiques. Mostly the products I am shooting are direct from my clients’ new ranges, but I do add in incidental props to help the shoot have a real-life feel.


Each shot for the day, is planned and sketched out, so on the day the whole crew, photographer, client, assistants, know what we are doing, where & when.


I decide within each shot what items of furniture, product and props we are using, and where in the location we should set up.


On the shoot day, from the start we are busy receiving the delivery of props and products, unpacking all the props and setting up the product to shoot. There is a lot of unpacking and packing, it does feel like you are moving house everyday.


Photographer Ben Roberston of 7am Creative works his magic helping me direct the shoot and capturing Alternative’s new designs on camera.


Being on a shoot is hard work but gives a great sense of achievement, once the day is over and the shots have all been done. Packing up and loading the van and car is a great end to the day and then it is on to the next and doing it all again!




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We know that our readers are smart, so we are going to straighten out the difference between herringbone and chevron flooring. It’s all about the zigzag. In the chevron, the rectangles run point to point and the ends are cut at an angle to create a continuous zigzag design. With the herringbone, the rectangles finish perpendicular to each other, resulting in a broken zigzag.


This leads nicely to the theme of this month’s blog – texture and herringbone. We are honing in on Alternative Flooring’s great range of natural fibre floors sourced from the world of monsoon-grown grasses – Sisal, Coir, Jute and Seagrass.  Each gives herringbone a different texture from husky coir and rustic seagrass to smart sisal.  All bring the great outdoors in and are full of tactile goodness.


To begin with a bit of history. The condensed read is that herringbone gets its name from the way the pattern resembles a fish skeleton. The origins of herringbone lie in the road system developed by the Roman Empire around 500 B.C. It’s got Celtic history too: horsehair herringbone cloth has been found in Ireland from 600 B.C, which explains why it’s also a traditional choice for tweed.


Fast-forward, and herringbone is as popular as ever. It is one of the easiest patterns to wear in fashion and on floors. It’s classic, contemporary and cool.


Sisal Herringbone Hockley


Alternative Flooring’s natural fibres are sustainably sourced. Sisal breezes in from Africa and the Mexican Gulf where it is extracted from the leaf of Agave Sisalana. It’s soft and exotic but the toughest natural fibre in the range.


Alternative’s Sisal Herringbone makes a subtle architectural statement in both classic and contemporary interiors.  This pattern that creates a feeling of space and elegance with textural interest that doesn’t overpower.  This range gives directional charm and instant character used as a carpet, rug or runner.


For nature lovers everywhere and the more minimalist-minded Sisal Herringbone is a great solution for people who want a tactile wall-to-wall carpet to look more crisp and contemporary.  Spread lovingly across a whole room this design gives a multi-hued sense of wellbeing.


Sisal Herringbone Hockley


Herringbone is fabulous for runners and stairways as the design elongates the space.  Tonal shades add interest whilst complementing the beauty of wooden floors. Alternative’s Sisal Herringbone is available in nine natural shades and the good news is it now comes in pre-cut runner widths.


Sisal Herringbone Hythe


For rugs and runners the border choice is endless. Get in touch with your creative side and try out the ‘Make Me A Rug’ online service. Herringbone borders add a crisp contrast in six smart shades – black, grey, blue, green, lilac and pewter.


Herringbone Borders


Full of natural goodness coir comes crafted from Indian coconut husk fibres softened in seawater. Hearty and homely, rich and resilient Coir is fibrous and tactile. The Natural and Bleached Coir Herringbones are the husky, hairy members of the natural fibre family. This homespun herringbone runner contrasts beautifully with the wooden herringbone floor.


Coir Herringbone Natural


Seagrass is about as textural and tropical as it gets. Effortlessly uplifting, Seagrass Herringbone and Fine Herringbone weaves light into everyday life.


Seagrass Herringbone Natural


Jute is hand-harvested from the tiliaceae plant and is as soft as Goan and uplifting as golden sunshine. Go chunky with Big Herringbone Bagel for a cosy, snuggle feel. Go silky with Fine Jute Herringbone, which makes a softer bedroom choice. Jute has a more tweedy looks, which leads us onto the latest natural fibre floor.


A new member of the Alternative family is Sisal Tweed. Tweed has its roots in Scotland and this tightly woven design has four colourways that recall Scottish towns – Tealing, Tarvie, Tomatin and Tinwald.


Sisal Tweed Tarvie


Sisal Tweed Tealing and Sisal Tarvie


Sisal Tweed Tomatin and Sisal Tinwald


Tweed is stylishly rough in texture with a slightly unfinished look.  Fashionistas love it for its classic and vintage appeal.

Little wonder both tweed and herringbone are now making their way into the homes of style-setters.


Make Me a Rug

Find out more about natural fibre flooring 

And take a look at Alternative Flooring on houzz





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New Year, new trends


Carole King is an Interior Designer and author of Dear Designer’s Blog where she writes daily about current trends, shopping tips and anything else that inspires her. She is also the co-founder and joint EIC of Heart Home magazine which is a blogazine dedicated to showcasing British design.


Some trends are fleeting. Some are what we might call micro-trends (remember the pineapples cropping up on homewares everywhere?). But some trends continue season after season, gathering momentum and pace until they’re not a trend at all. They are just a lifestyle choice. A reflection of our own tastes, and a foundation on which to build a home that simply makes us happy.


With that in mind, here are six ‘trends’ that I predict will be around for a long time yet…


Scandinavian. You could say it’s been around for hundreds of years. It’s evolved like any other interior trend and now it’s typified by a simple, honest and clean approach to decorating. It’s been made even more popular by the popularity on Pinterest of white walls, blond wood furniture, an open-plan layout and an absence of clutter. Windows are left bare so as to let in as much light as possible, and furs, candles, and textures from the natural world provide the finishing touches.


Sustainability. Not so much a trend, as a lifestyle choice. Consumers often now give careful consideration to the provenance of new purchases and choose products that are good for themselves, their families and the planet. It’s the exact opposite of fashion in fact, as homewares are chosen for their longevity and enduring appeal.


1. Kith & Kin via Heart Home. 2. Wool Herringbone via Alternative Flooring. 3. Mylands Paints. 4. Wallpaper via House of Hackney. 5. Amara. 6. Arthouse.


Botanicals. A trend that stems from the desire to bring the outside in. It’s not enough to have a collection of healthy house-plants any more. Now you can cover your walls, upholstery, curtains, and accessories with all manner of flora from woodland specimens, to country garden prettiness, to full-blown jungle blooms. Of course, you can choose to cultivate a little or a lot, making this the perfect trend to flirt with or to have a long lasting affair with.


1. Dotcomgiftshop. 2. Lombok. 3. Kelly Swallow. 4. Rose & Grey. 5. Big Jute via Alternative Flooring. 6.Red 5.


Industrial. Another trend that owes its existence to our desire be kind to the planet. A decision to turn our backs on the throw-away culture and to re-use and re-cycle where ever possible has led to a quiet revolution in our homes. It’s fashionable to make-do and mend and has led to lots of interiors that make a virtue of factory lighting, upcycled wood, bare brick walls and vintage ephemera.


Pastels. Will be big in 2016 especially since Pantone have declared Serenity (baby blue) and Rose Quartz (baby pink) will be the colours of the year. How you use them is a matter of choice but my prediction is that they will be combined a lot with the Scandinavian trend above. Too many pastels together will give a nursery look, but used in moderation with lots of white and pale wood they can produce a very calming and sophisticated look.


1.Barker & Stonehouse. 2. Barefoot via Alternative Flooring. 3. Oliver Bonas. 4. Homesense. 5.Houseology.


Metallics. Copper has been a big trend for a couple of years now and it doesn’t look as if it’s going away. In fact it’s being joined by brass in a big way. Yes, it’s okay to mix metals but stick to warm metals – any with a hint of gold. They make fantastic accent colours, make statement lighting stand out, and mix with any of the trends above.






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This winter we need some cosy colour and pattern on the chilly, grey days to warm our homes, lift our spirits and have some fun. We love naturals but pops of colour make everything glow. Think of colour on your floors like wearing jewellery – crisp white diamonds might be the traditional Christmas sparkle but kaleidoscopic jewels bring a welcome cheer this time of year.


The January issue of House & Garden is devoted to Winter Living but there is no sight of white on the cover. Instead, we see the colourful Bloomsbury flat of Ben Pentreath.


Here are our tops tips for colour and pattern play this Christmas.


- Pattern pops

Fair Isle by Margo Selby for Alternative Flooring is like having your favourite Christmas jumper carpet your floors. This vibrant pattern makes punchy runner for hallways and stairs against snowy white boards. White or other light neutrals allow the eye to take a breather from all that pattern goodness, and can add to the depth of a space.


-  Pattern Pace

Like our lives, our homes need a change of pace.  Living spaces can take colourful patterns with verve but bedrooms are places for softer shades and nature-inspired designs just like Quirky B Daisy by Ashley Hicks or Geo honeycomb in duck egg. Both are beautiful to wake up to.


-  Pattern partners

Spread pattern through rooms by combining different patterns in the same tone or use one pattern in two shades that complement each other.  Ben Pentreath for Alternative Flooring has designed three designed with a linking geometric theme.


I wanted each carpet to relate to one another – meaning, perhaps, that you could move from pattern to pattern in a project, but with a common unifying theme. Some patterns we wanted to be very rich other colours wanted to be much more neutral.’ Ben Pentreath


- Practical Pattern

Alternative Flooring’s distinctive Quirky B patterned carpet is not just stylish but practical. Patterns don’t show marks while wool is both soft and strong. Little wonder the whole nation is warming to the comfort of wool carpet and the joy of pattern.


’I love pattern, and especially on the floor. It gives instant character and vitality to a space, as well as usefully hiding marks and damage (as a father, I know about that!)’ Ashley Hicks


- Patternity

This season’s buzzword and also the clever title of a new book – ‘Patternity a new way of seeing: the inspirational power of pattern’. Here are pattern-related images from a myriad of sources across the worlds of fashion and interiors to art, architecture and science, food and drink to technology and education – juxtaposed in an uplifting tome that will cheer up anyone’s Christmas.


‘Patterns are something we come across every day. We wear theme, we walk wear them, we walk over them, we even eat, drink and think them – we always have and we always will.’


If you like to read more about colour and pattern on floors go here….





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